11 comments on “A Healthier Spud – And It’s GM

  1. If the inserted genes come from other potato varieties or wild potatoes does that make Innate cisgenic rather than transgenic?

    • You know I thought about that too… after I wrote it and since I had to edit the article anyway, I decided not to use the word transgenic anywhere in the post. I just wanted to be kind of playful about this potato because no doubt, down the pike we’ll see some negative propaganda about it.

  2. Please convince me that
    1.a toxic dose of acrylamide is produced in cooking normal potatoes.
    2.that the public wants this product by citing a poll of consumers demonstrating a market demand.
    3. that the miRNA sequences are published and have been thoroughly checked for homology to human and animal miRNAs.
    4. that you understand the technology involved in engineering these potatoes, Julee?

    • Hi dogctor,
      It is not always necessary for a market to specifically demand a product. Sometimes, supply comes first. Currently, I’d say there is a market demand. Potatoes, while cheap, could still be cheaper. Same with the things made from them. By preventing bruising and retaining starches, potatoes will be wasted far less as less are damaged or spoiled in transport. This means cheaper/more potatoes for you and me, and less waste!
      Braeden

    • There’s enough acrylamide produced in fried potatoes that major food makers had to settle a California Prop 65 case because acrylamide is in the list of carcinogens that is subject to Prop 65. The actual scientific evidence of harm from typical foods is more mixed but still enough to trigger continued interest in lowering levels allowed in food. One problem with potatoes, of course, is that certain varieties and under certain conditions, they can produce a lot more asparagine than normal.

      As for miRNAs, as far as I know there is only one study that even suggests miRNAs in food might be an issue and it hasn’t even been replicated. I’m not sure what your concern is at this point. If miRNAs in food are a problem, then they are a problem in ALL foods, created with modern methods or not. In any case, the ones in this proposed food seem to be ones we’d be eating already.

  3. @Cogctor If you bake or fry a potato and there is a browned patch, there is going to be acrylamide. If you boil it or microwave it, there will not be acrylamide. That is my understanding and no, I’m not a scientist…never claimed to be one. So what do I do? I rely on my own ability to discern which experts I’m going to believe, and then I believe them because they are experts. I conduct the same type of discernment process with my accountant, my lawyer, my physician – heck, even my hair stylist.

    And you know, as much as one who doesn’t work in the field can understand, I do understand the technology involved in engineering these potatoes. I did cite the original potato research report if you want to know more.

  4. Have you ever thought about writing an ebook
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  5. Pingback: Pretty Nifty GM Tomatoes | SLEUTH 4 HEALTH

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